Family Guide for Navigating Early Intervention Services

Navigating Early Intervention Services

According to Moms Rising, parents and caregivers should keep the following tips in mind when navigating early intervention services:

  • Trust your instincts about your child’s early development.
  • Seek out knowledge and information on early development and document your concerns.
  • Keep a record of all important information.
  • Prepare for meetings with your early intervention team and don’t be afraid to ask questions.
  • Build positive Relationships and communicate regularly with the professionals on your early intervention team.
  • Understand the policies and regulations governing early intervention services.

Parents and caregivers should be aware of their risk for burnout when navigating the processes for early intervention. Consider joining a support group or practicing self care regularly. Parents and caregivers may also want to consider the feelings of non-disabled siblings and encourage discussion with them to ease any tension within the family.

Parents and caregivers who are interested in learning more about advocating for their child’s wellbeing may participate in educational opportunities from the PEAL Center. PEAL is an organization of parents of children with disabilities and/or special health care needs who bring knowledge and experience as a resource for education and special healthcare information and resources in Pennsylvania.

More Information

To learn more about navigating the early intervention process, access this comprehensive guide from the Pennsylvania Department of Education (available in both English and Spanish).

Image: An early learning professional holds a young child gently, with another playing happily on the floor.

Series Navigation

The Developmentally Appropriate Parenting Series highlights several early childhood topics to support parents and caregivers who are caring for young children. Use the list below to navigate through each series topic:

Learn more about the series.

 

Picture: A young baby looks up at the camera.
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