News

June 14, 2019

Public Hearing on Chapter 49: Certification of Professional Personnel

The Pennsylvania State Board of Education will conduct a public hearing in Homestead to receive input from interested parties on draft proposed amendments to Chapter 49 (Certification of Professional Personnel). Registrations must be submitted by noon on June 11, 2019.

Testimony Limitations

Testimony is limited to no more than 5 minutes, and participants will be assigned a time slot on a first come, first served basis when they register. If a hearing site reaches capacity, the Board will place interested participants on a waiting list and will notify members of the waiting list if space becomes available. Each hearing will conclude after the last scheduled witness testifies.

In order to accommodate as many perspectives as possible, individuals representing an organization are limited to a one-time slot and that organization may only present testimony at one hearing location. However, the hearings are public meetings of the Board and, therefore, members of the public are free to attend and observe the proceedings.

Those registered to testify must provide 25 copies of their written testimony at the hearing.

Registration and Questions

Persons interested in presenting testimony must register with the Board office at ra-stateboardofed@pa.gov or (717) 787-3787, Monday through Friday (excluding holidays) between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Registrations must be submitted by noon on June 11, 2019.

Registrations submitted via email must include your name, affiliation, phone number, email address, and the date and location of the hearing in which you would like to participate.

Accessibility

Individuals with disabilities who wish to attend a hearing and require an auxiliary aid, service, or other accommodation to participate should contact Jenna DeNoyelles, ADA Coordinator, at (717) 783-9338 to discuss how the Board may best accommodate their needs.

Persons with disabilities are invited to submit public comments in alternative formats such as Braille or taped testimony and by means of the telephone. Written and alternative formats of public comment will be afforded the same thoughtful consideration as oral remarks.

Read the full notice.

News

May 29, 2019

Get Ready for the Next Steps

Are you wondering about how the preschool enrollment process works? Unsure of how to assess or choose a local school for your child? Have questions about whether your child is ready for Pre-K or Kindergarten?

Join us at the Pittsburgh Toy Lending Library for an information session co-hosted by A+ Schools and Trying Together, with Pittsburgh Public Schools’ Early Education. A pizza dinner will be served. Children are welcome! This is event is FREE and open to the public.

Questions

For more information, call 412.682.4430 or email outreach@pghtoys.org.

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News

May 17, 2019

PPS: Take a Father to School Day 2019

Pittsburgh Public Schools welcomes fathers, grandfathers, uncles, and positive male role models to participate in the nationally recognized Take a Father to School Day.

In support of the District’s long-term outcome of increased proficiency in literacy for all students, this year’s theme is #ExpectGreatThings. Every school will have an activity or event planned to celebrate the day.

Ask your school for details!

Questions

For questions, contact Larry Meadows at 412.529.3851.

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News

April 9, 2019

Month of the Young Child: Celebrating Early Childhood

With Trying Together having designated April as the Month of the Young Child (MOYC), Kidsburgh asked Executive Director Cara Ciminillo to explain why access to high-quality early childhood care and education is so vital for our youngest generation.

Overview

In the article, Ciminillo explains why access to early learning and care is critical and moves on to discuss the roles of advocacy, policy, and investments. Identifying connections to Trying Together’s public policy agenda, Ciminillo explains that by successfully advocating for increased investments in early childhood, we’re working to ensure that all young children have access to affordable, high-quality programs; that all early childhood professionals are being compensated appropriately; and that all early childhood programs have access to the support they need to provide high-quality services.

Article

To read the full article, visit Kidsburgh’s website!

News

March 15, 2019

Disability and Mental Health Summit

Join State Representative Dan Miller in the 2019 Disability and Mental Health Summit. Happening over three days, this summit includes the following opportunities:

  • Informative Sessions
    • Topics of interest for parents, students, providers, and professionals seeking continuing education
  • A Resource Fair
    • State, county, and local agencies; service providers, advocacy and support groups; post-secondary education organizations; and employment opportunities

Free and open to the public, this summit includes multiple sessions on a range of disabilities and mental health issues spanning from early intervention to adults and seniors.

View the attached flyer or visit the Summit website for more information.

News

March 14, 2019

Disability and Mental Health Summit

Join State Representative Dan Miller in the 2019 Disability and Mental Health Summit. Happening over three days, this summit includes the following opportunities:

  • Informative Sessions
    • Topics of interest for parents, students, providers, and professionals seeking continuing education
  • A Resource Fair
    • State, county, and local agencies; service providers, advocacy and support groups; post-secondary education organizations; and employment opportunities

Free and open to the public, this summit includes multiple sessions on a range of disabilities and mental health issues spanning from early intervention to adults and seniors.

View the attached flyer or visit the Summit website for more information.

News

March 13, 2019

Disability and Mental Health Summit

Join State Representative Dan Miller in the 2019 Disability and Mental Health Summit. Happening over three days, this summit includes the following opportunities:

  • Informative Sessions
    • Topics of interest for parents, students, providers, and professionals seeking continuing education
  • A Resource Fair
    • State, county, and local agencies; service providers, advocacy and support groups; post-secondary education organizations; and employment opportunities

Free and open to the public, this summit includes multiple sessions on a range of disabilities and mental health issues spanning from early intervention to adults and seniors.

View the attached flyer or visit the Summit website for more information.

 

News

February 18, 2019

PA Board of Education Hosting Public Hearing in Homestead

The Pennsylvania State Board of Education will conduct a public hearing in Homestead on April 23, 2019 to receive input from interested parties on draft proposed amendments to Chapter 49 (Certification of Professional Personnel).

Current Chapter 49 Regulations.

Testimony Limitations

Testimony is limited to no more than 5 minutes, and participants will be assigned a time slot on a first come, first served basis when they register. If a hearing site reaches capacity, the Board will place interested participants on a waiting list and will notify members of the waiting list if space becomes available. Each hearing will conclude after the last scheduled witness testifies.

Those registered to testify must provide 25 copies of their written testimony at the hearing.

Registration and Questions

Persons interested in presenting testimony must register with the Board office at ra-stateboardofed@pa.gov or (717) 787-3787, Monday through Friday (excluding holidays) between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Registrations must be submitted no later than April 18 at noon.

Registrations submitted via email must include your name, affiliation, phone number, email address, and the date and location of the hearing in which you would like to participate.

Accessibility

Individuals with disabilities who wish to attend a hearing and require an auxiliary aid, service, or other accommodation to participate should contact Jenna DeNoyelles, ADA Coordinator, at (717) 783-9338 to discuss how the Board may best accommodate their needs.

Persons with disabilities are invited to submit public comments in alternative formats such as Braille or taped testimony and by means of the telephone. Written and alternative formats of public comment will be afforded the same thoughtful consideration as oral remarks.

Not Able to Attend?

Individuals unable to attend the hearing may submit written testimony directly to the Board on or before April 24, 2019. Written comments should be sent to:

State Board of Education
333 Market Street, 1st Floor
Harrisburg, PA 17126
ra-stateboardofed@pa.gov

Read the full notice.

News

February 11, 2019

What’s It Really Worth? How to Run a Profitable Child Care Business

Through this four-week online session, participants learn the basic principles of operating the business of a child care program.

With a focus on maximizing profits, Trying Together will present opportunities to minimize expenses and illustrate ways that various public funding sources and Keystone STARS participation may affect program revenue. Primarily intended for child care program administrators, owners, and operators, this course provides valuable resources for those interested in applying for Pre-K Counts, or for family and group child care program leaders who are interested in learning more about operating profitably.

This online course occurs over the timeline of four weeks (Start Date: Monday, February 11 through Monday, March 11, 2019), and will be offering four hours of Professional Development after completion of the session.

Questions

For more information on how to register, contact Jasmine Davis at 412.421.3889 or jasmine@tryingtogether.org.

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News

December 5, 2018

What’s Next for the Allegheny County Children’s Fund?

Although the outcome of “Our Kids. Our Commitment.” initiative was not what proponents wanted, key stakeholders are looking toward the future and finding some victory in the vote.

Voting Results

During the recent election, over 513,000 Allegheny County residents cast their vote on a proposed amendment to establish the Allegheny County Children’s Fund through an increase in property taxes (0.25 millage rate, an estimated $30 increase per year for the average household). The fund would have supported early learning opportunities for children, after-school programs and nutritious meals. The amendment was defeated, with 48.31 percent of voters in support and 51.69 percent against.

“What I heard from my constituents was that they liked the idea of increased and specific funding for early learning, after-school programming, and nutrition programs,” says Councilwoman Deb Gross. “But they had concerns about the governance of the fund.”

What Does This Mean?

The defeat means that Allegheny County still does not dedicate any funding to early learning programs and nutritious meals but does allocate approximately $8 million to after-school programs. Advocates of the Children’s Fund say, despite the vote’s outcome, the need for these programs is still there, and that the vote showed that there is great public interest in finding a solution to funding these programs for our children.

“What this tells us is that just over a half-million people in Allegheny County care about this issue,” says Patrick Dowd, executive director of Allies for Children. “There is wide consensus that these types of programs are something we should be supporting, and clearly a number of people care about this issue. That part to us is helpful and inspiring.”

James Doyle, executive director of Higher Achievement, Pittsburgh, appreciates the number of people who did vote yes. “The people are saying they care about these three critical things enough to support a small increase in their taxes,” he says. “That sends a strong message for us to continue our work.”

Advocates agree that the vote shows people care about this issue and people want to see some sort of funding be provided for this type of early childhood support.

What’s Next?

The 10 organizations that came together to form the Allegheny County Children’s Fund Initiative will continue to advocate for these programs in the day-to-day work of their organizations.  The path to move forward, Dowd says, is through continued conversations with supporters, as well as listening very carefully to those who weren’t supportive.

The group plans to create a space for people to re-engage as they sift through many ideas and other feedback they received.  A future source of funding will need to have a transparent means of reporting back to the public, they say, but the source of that funding remains to be seen.

Allegheny Children’s Fund supporters will continue to advocate for these initiatives in the day-to-day work of their organizations, as well as through their continued collaboration to create a source of funding that will support these programs in the long-term.

“Our organization’s mission has been and will continue to be one that focuses on advocating on behalf of the needs and rights of children,” says Cara Ciminillo, executive director of Trying Together. “The needs remain and the needs are great.”

“I am hopeful that the state will continue the pattern of the past few years with incremental increases to funding for these programs, but this has not been enough to fill the gap,” she says. “We will be continuing the effort to look for local revenue to help support some of that gap.”

*Information provided by Kidsburgh*