News

February 14, 2020

Women’s Rap

Are you a single mom or caregiver in need of self-care? Women’s Rap provides a safe place for communication, encouragement, and reflection. Join us to build your confidence, gratitude, and supportive relationships with other women.

Dinner is served between 5:00–5:45 p.m. and group starts promptly at 6:00 p.m. Parent-child interactions are from 7:00–8:00 p.m.

More Information

For more information, contact Toni Beasley at toni@tryingtogether.org or 412.727.6649.

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News

January 10, 2020

Women’s Rap

Are you a single mom or caregiver in need of self-care? Women’s Rap provides a safe place for communication, encouragement, and reflection. Join us to build your confidence, gratitude, and supportive relationships with other women.

Dinner is served between 5:00–5:45 p.m. and group starts promptly at 6:00 p.m. Parent-child interactions are from 7:00–8:00 p.m.

More Information

For more information, contact Toni Beasley at toni@tryingtogether.org or 412.727.6649.

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News

December 13, 2019

Women’s Rap

Are you a single mom or caregiver in need of self-care? Women’s Rap provides a safe place for communication, encouragement, and reflection. Join us to build your confidence, gratitude, and supportive relationships with other women.

Dinner is served between 5:00–5:45 p.m. and group starts promptly at 6:00 p.m. Parent-child interactions are from 7:00–8:00 p.m.

More Information

For more information, contact Toni Beasley at toni@tryingtogether.org or 412.727.6649.

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November 19, 2019

Fatherhood: The Importance of Listening to Fathers

Join Brazelton Touchpoints Center on Tuesday, November 19 for a webinar with professor and researcher, Dr. Kyle Pruett, M.D.

About

Dr. Kyle Pruett is a Clinical Professor of Child Psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine and pioneering researcher on fathers and their children. In this webinar, he will discuss fatherhood and the importance of listening to fathers and engaging them in their children’s development.

Registration

To register for this webinar and learn more, visit the event webpage.

More Information

For questions, contact Kayla Savelli at kayla.savelli@childrens.harvard.edu.

News

November 14, 2019

Anti-Racism in Early Education

What does it mean to bring an anti-racist lens to the classroom? Join Dr. Kerry-Ann Escayg and P.R.I.D.E. on November 14 to find out.

About

On November 14, community members are invited to join P.R.I.D.E. at the Homewood Community Engagement Center for their event, “Anti-Racism in Early Education.” As a part of the P.R.I.D.E. Speaker Series, the event will feature anti-racism scholar Dr. Kerry-Ann Escayg. Dr. Escayg is an assistant professor of early childhood education at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Her work focuses on bringing an anti-racist framework to early education.

P.R.I.D.E.

P.R.I.D.E. (Positive Racial Identity Development in Early Education) is part of the University of Pittsburgh Office of Child Development within the School of Education. Their goal is to help young Black children, aged 3 to 8, understand race and embrace their ethnicity and heritage.

Registration

To RSVP, visit the event registration page.

More Information

For questions, contact P.R.I.D.E. at 412.383.8726 or adamflango@pitt.edu.

*Information provided by P.R.I.D.E.

News

November 13, 2019

Supporting Young Children During Transitions

Writing for Child Mind Institute, Katherine Martinelli recently authored “How Can We Help Kids With Transitions,” highlighting key tips and advice for parents and caregivers seeking to support their young children.

About

When it comes to transitions–to kindergarten, a new program, or a new routine–young children often struggle. When children whine, stall, meltdown, or have a tantrum, some parents and caregivers aren’t sure where to turn. In an effort to empower these caregivers, Katherine Martinelli authored an article highlighting eight tips for supporting young children during the transition process, mentioning that these supports may be especially important for children with ADHD, anxiety, autism, or sensory sensitivities.

Tips & Advice

    • Create Routines
      Setting routines for daily activities such as bedtime, taking a bath, or putting away toys can play a big role in reassuring children during such transitions.
    • Preview and Count Down
      In addition to routines, providing a clear outline of what the day will entail can help children adequately prepare for transitions to come. Caregivers can do this in the morning with their children, paired with countdowns throughout the day. Before each transition, give your child a timeframe and description of what’s going to happen next.
    • Give It a Soundtrack
      Songs are a great tool to encourage routines and ease transitions. By creating songs for things such as cleaning up, bedtime, and getting ready to leave, caregivers establish a recognizable, fun indicator that a transition is happening. This tip works especially well with young children.
    • Visual Cues
      Some children may benefit from visual clues, such as a chart or poster with drawings that explain what to expect or the steps of a transition. Parents and caregivers can easily reference these visual cues during the transition to help walk children through the process.
    • Get Their Attention
      Many parents and caregivers know that simply yelling at children from across the room will only lead to frustration for both parties. Instead, caregivers are encouraged to make a connection with the child to ensure the child is giving their full attention. This could mean eye contact, a hand on the shoulder, sitting next to them, or asking them to repeat back what has been said.
    • Use Rewards
      Reward systems can be beneficial in schools and at home, especially during the early phases of a new transition. Using rewards such as stickers, snacks, or a point system can be effective in supporting positive behaviors. With this, the reward system can be phased out as a child gets closer to mastering the transition.
    • Implement Appropriate Consequences
      If a child exhibits negative behaviors during a transition, ignore the negative behavior rather than escalating the situation. However, if a child is egregiously misbehaving, parents and caregivers should implement “appropriate consequences for that behavior that makes the child understand that behavior is off-limits.”
    • Praise Good Transitioning
      Praise and recognition play a vital role in reinforcing positive behaviors. Martinelli recommends that caregivers be specific in their praise, following up with a reward when appropriate.

More Information

For more tips and advice on supporting children during transitions, read the full article on the Child Mind Institute website.

News

November 8, 2019

Women’s Rap

Are you a single mom or caregiver in need of self-care? Women’s Rap provides a safe place for communication, encouragement, and reflection. Join us to build your confidence, gratitude, and supportive relationships with other women.

Dinner is served between 5:00–5:45 p.m. and group starts promptly at 6:00 p.m. Parent-child interactions are from 7:00–8:00 p.m.

More Information

For more information, contact Toni Beasley at toni@tryingtogether.org or 412.727.6649.

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October 18, 2019

ACF Seeks Input On Improving Quality Child Care Access

On October 2, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) posted a Request for Information (RFI) on improving access to affordable, high-quality child care in the United States.

About

ACF is focused on finding innovative solutions to improve working families’ access to affordable, high quality child care, as well as investigating how access to child care affects America’s workforce, present, and future. Child care is one of the biggest expenses a family faces and can be a barrier to work. The average cost of center-based infant child care in 28 states is more than college tuition.

At the same time, there is concern about the quality of child care and ensuring that child care settings are a place of education that promote and enhance child and youth development and well-being. High-quality child care is a critical investment that pays off now, for parents by enabling them to work, and later, by supporting children’s development and success in school and life. This request for information seeks public comment on innovative ways to address the affordability and access crisis of child care in the U.S., without compromising on quality.

Information collected through this RFI may be used by ACF in the development of future rulemaking and technical assistance, the formation of legislative proposals and research agenda, and/or strategic planning. To learn more, visit the RFI page.

Intended Audience and Stakeholders

AFI is looking to receive input from a wide range of stakeholders, including, but not limited to, parents who use child care; parents of children with disabilities; small child care businesses; employers; state and local chambers of commerce; foundations; faith-based and other community organizations; family child care networks; child care resource and referral agencies; universities and other institutions of higher education; child care workforce development organizations, etc.

RFI Topics

    • Building Supply of Child Care
    • Improving Child Care Regulations
    • Cultivating the Child Care Workforce
    • Developing Better Child Care Business Models
    • Transforming Financing of Child Care and Early Education Programs

Submit Your Comment

To submit a comment, visit the RFI page. All comments must be submitted by December 2, 2019.

*Information provided by the Administration of Children and Families

News

October 11, 2019

Women’s Rap

Are you a single mom or caregiver in need of self-care? Women’s Rap provides a safe place for communication, encouragement, and reflection. Join us to build your confidence, gratitude, and supportive relationships with other women.

Dinner is served between 5:00–5:45 p.m. and group starts promptly at 6:00 p.m. Parent-child interactions are from 7:00–8:00 p.m.

More Information

For more information, contact Toni Beasley at toni@tryingtogether.org or 412.727.6649.

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News

September 26, 2019

How to Balance Children’s Digital Media Consumption

In their 2017 “Common Sense Census” report, Common Sense Media found that “children age eight and under spend an average of about two-and-a-quarter hours a day with screen media.” While digital media can be fun and informative, caregivers must be intentional in regulating their own and their child’s media consumption.

The Common Sense Census

To better understand the types of technology available to young children and how children utilize those technologies, Common Sense Media surveyed a representative sample of over 1,400 parents from regions across the United States. The survey included low- and high-income families, parents who received varying levels of education, and families from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds.

Through the survey, Common Sense Media found that 98 percent of children age eight and younger have access to some type of mobile device in their home, with 98 percent having access to a television, 95 percent having access to a smartphone, and 78 percent having access to a tablet. In fact, 42 percent of the families surveyed reported that their child now has their own tablet device, a drastic increase from the reported seven percent four years ago.

Through these developments, children now spend more time consuming digital media per day than they do reading or being read to, with the survey average daily reading time reported as 30 minutes. Read the full report.

Risks of Excess Exposure

All media types, from movies and television shows to social platforms and gaming apps, expose consumers of all ages to a variety of content and messaging. While digital devices can be fun and incorporated as learning tools, they also pose threats to the early experiences of young children by:

    • increasing the likelihood that a child accidentally views violent or inappropriate content,
    • reducing the daily total time spent outside and being active,
    • and limiting children’s early opportunities to develop relationships and social, emotional, and communication skills.

With these risks, parents and caregivers must be intentional in monitoring the media content their children consume and the daily total time spent inside on digital devices. However, families must go one step further. Caregivers must also model healthy media balance behaviors themselves, integrating the same practices into their daily lives that they’re teaching their children. It’s critical that families establish a healthy balance between their offline and online activities.

Resources and Tools

To increase awareness and provide strategies on tackling this issue, Common Sense Media launched a series of resources for families and professionals, including:

*By texting the word KIDS to 21555, families can receive weekly text message tips on how to practice healthy media habits with their family and young children. Tips provided through this service are suitable for caregivers of children ages three to eight years old. Texts are available in English and Spanish. Standard messaging rates apply.

Learn More

To learn more about digital balance, visit the Common Sense Media website.