News

July 12, 2019

Don’t Be A Trigger: Trauma-Informed Care Approach

Looking for a more in-depth dive into Trauma-Informed Care? Join Debralyn Woodberry Shaw of ELIE Circle, LLC to explore trauma might manifest in your early childhood or youth program.

About

Our past experiences – personal, familial, societal – influence our brain development and shape how we interpret and respond to the world. In this session, youth workers will explore how trauma might manifest in their program. Participants will also learn how self-awareness and a growth mindset aid in creating a Trauma-Informed Community and protect youth workers from the effects of vicarious trauma. Lunch will be provided.

Learning Objectives

Participants will:

    • be introduced to the Trauma-Informed Care framework,
    • become familiar with the foundations of Trauma-Informed Care,
    • understand complex trauma and the parts of the brain related to trauma,
    • be introduced to vicarious trauma,
    • identify self-care and building resilience techniques,
    • reflect on their past experiences and how they influence their interactions with young people, and
    • explore the concept of a growth mindset.

Registration and Questions

To register for this workshop, visit APOST’s event page.

For questions, contact APOST at 412.456.6876.

*Information provided by APOST

News

April 26, 2019

Harnessing the ‘Power of Play’ to Build Equitable Cities

When planners and community stakeholders are hashing out asset inventories and needs assessments to figure out the state of neighborhood amenities, a few things are sure to almost always make the list: more access to green space, safer crosswalks, more parking in business districts, gateways, and wayfinding signage. When planners design communities to be safer, healthier, more sustainable, and more walkable, how often do those efforts make a community more playful?

The Power of Play

Play is powerful. In the sphere of early childhood education, experts recognize the unparalleled importance of play in learning and development. In business, play is seen as a gateway to greater creativity, collaboration, and breakthrough innovation. In society, communities that play together stay together.

Isn’t it time we embraced playfulness as a quality worth designing into our urban spaces? Perhaps the trouble is that the word itself seems just too playful to be taken seriously. We need more words for play.

More Words for Play

The Finnish language has no shortage of words for play. For Finns, playing a game is different from playing a sport, which is different from playing music. There are distinct Finnish words for children’s play and the play that adults engage in. There’s even a Finnish word that means both “work” and “play.” This rich vocabulary shows that in Finland, play is a valued part of life that isn’t confined just to kids’ stuff.

 

Where else would we see play show up in our plans, if only we had the words for it?

 

What would we call the kind of play that brings strangers together?

 

What would we call playing around with ideas and possibilities?

 

It’s questions like these that motivated a coalition of public and private sector partners to start the Playful Pittsburgh Collaborative and organize a citywide movement to expand the presence of play in every community. As a mid-size, post-industrial city in the midst of dramatic changes spurred in large part by new development, we see a mandate to build greater public demand for play as an integral part of the city’s future.

Playful Pittsburgh Collaborative

Locally in southwestern Pennsylvania, the Playful Pittsburgh Collaborative is working to make play a part of the urban infrastructure.

Since 2013, members of the Playful Pittsburgh Collaborative have been working together to find and remove the barriers holding communities back from experiencing the social benefits of play. These efforts have brought together leaders and representatives from the city’s parks and museums, human services and municipal agencies, arts and sustainability nonprofits, and community development groups. Along the way, we’ve encountered distinct manifestations of play that we really wish had their own name.

Learn more about the work of The Playful Pittsburgh Collaborative and read the full article from the urban planning magazine Planetizen.

(shared via Planetizen)

News

April 9, 2019

Trauma-Informed Care: Training Session

Our past experiences – personal, familial, societal – influence our brain development and shape how we interpret and respond to the world. Sometimes adults do not recognize how these experiences manifest as behaviors and they unintentionally harm children. This introductory session is designed to change participants’ approach to the behaviors children exhibit to decrease the likelihood of triggering them.

Session Objectives

  • Participants will be introduced to the Trauma-Informed Care framework.
  • Participants will become familiar with the foundations of Trauma-Informed Care.
  • Participants will understand complex trauma and the parts of the brain related to trauma.
  • Participants will learn to recognize the impacts of trauma.

To pre-register for this session, visit their Eventbrite page.

*A certificate of participation will be given upon request.

Session Focus Areas

General Overview
  • Trauma-Informed Care Framework
  • Complex Trauma including Brain Development
  • Impacts of Trauma
What ELIE Circle Is Bringing
  • Self-Reflection
  • Self-Care
  • Growth Mindset
Intentionally Building Relationships
  • Importance
  • Barriers including Race and Gender
  • Techniques
Communication
  • Importance
  • Barriers
  • Techniques including Motivational Interviewing, Empathic Communication, Restorative Practices

About ELIE Circle

ELIE Circle works to eliminate that through professional development training sessions that create trauma-informed communities – environments that focus on not re-traumatizing individuals and assist with development that may have been lost or delayed due to trauma – emotion regulation and empathy for example. ELIE Circle provides the following professional development services:

  • Collaboration to create training sessions for organizations
  • Consultation on creating trauma-informed out-of-school programs
  • Facilitation of discussions with Q&A

*Each customer receives a free consultation meeting to discuss organizational needs.

Questions & Concerns

For any questions or concerns, contact Debralyn Woodberry-Shaw, MSW, LSW at eliecircle@gmail.com.