News

July 12, 2019

Don’t Be A Trigger: Trauma-Informed Care Approach

Looking for a more in-depth dive into Trauma-Informed Care? Join Debralyn Woodberry Shaw of ELIE Circle, LLC to explore trauma might manifest in your early childhood or youth program.

About

Our past experiences – personal, familial, societal – influence our brain development and shape how we interpret and respond to the world. In this session, youth workers will explore how trauma might manifest in their program. Participants will also learn how self-awareness and a growth mindset aid in creating a Trauma-Informed Community and protect youth workers from the effects of vicarious trauma. Lunch will be provided.

Learning Objectives

Participants will:

    • be introduced to the Trauma-Informed Care framework,
    • become familiar with the foundations of Trauma-Informed Care,
    • understand complex trauma and the parts of the brain related to trauma,
    • be introduced to vicarious trauma,
    • identify self-care and building resilience techniques,
    • reflect on their past experiences and how they influence their interactions with young people, and
    • explore the concept of a growth mindset.

Registration and Questions

To register for this workshop, visit APOST’s event page.

For questions, contact APOST at 412.456.6876.

*Information provided by APOST

News

July 1, 2019

Fred Rogers Educators’ Neighborhood to Launch

Reflecting on a piece she wrote in December 2018, Melissa Butler identifies long-term benefits observed with the same group of children five months after the initial observation.

Additionally, the Fred Rogers Center announced that they will be launching “Educators’ Neighborhood: Learning and Growing Together” in support of early childhood teachers.

Overview

In December 2018, Melissa Butler wrote a blog article named, “Beechwood Kindergarteners Learn with Mister Rogers,” observing LeeAnne Kreuger’s kindergarten classroom as they gathered every Friday morning to watch an episode of “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.” Labeled “Mister Rogers Friday,” teachers selected an episode each week for their students based on key themes, needs, or interests expressed in the classroom.

What they observed from April through June 2018 was that by the end of the school year, the children were actively singing along, naming characters, and making fun connections throughout the school day. In addition to this, teachers noticed benefits as well, having significant learning opportunities to reflect on child development, cultural relevancy, and ways to weave Fred Rogers’ lessons into the school day.

Five months after, this same group of children continues to watch a new episode of “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” every week. By doing so, they’re still observing significant impacts and benefits.

Benefits for Children

Butler highlights that this group of children:

  • talk with each other during and after each Picture-Picture video because they have so many questions and connections;
  • know the difference between real and make-believe;
  • sing songs with confidence; answer Mister Rogers’ questions with eager attention;
  • allow for the silence and slowness of episode moments; and
  • have come to trust in the learning and joy each episode bring during and in the classroom.
Benefits for Educators

Teachers have also displayed key benefits, including:

  • more trust in their instincts;
  • more collaboration with each other;
  • more sharing of personal stories with students;
  • more confidence with developmentally appropriate practice;
  • more improvisation with what they choose to do after each episode; and
  • an overall approach that trusts in the larger picture of what they do as teachers.

Conclusion

Needless to say, the benefits of incorporating meaningful videos, especially those of “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood,” are substantial. When educators and students are allotted a period to slow down, reflect, and talk with one another about influential topics, all parties benefit in and out of the classroom. For more, read Butler’s full blog piece.

About Educators’ Neighborhood

Educators’ Neighborhood: Learning and Growing Together is a place for educators to learn more and with each other, inspired by the life and work of Fred Rogers. Fred Rogers Center will grow an expanded community of educators to study episodes of “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood,” read from the Fred Rogers Center Archive, and generate new ideas together connected with their daily practice with young children.

If you’re interested in joining, sign up for news, register for Educators’ Neighborhood Online, or apply to be part of the local Educators’ Neighborhood Learning Community.

More Information

For more information, read Butler’s full blog piece.

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News

June 17, 2019

Integrating Early Childhood Learning Standards into Curriculum & Assessment

Do you need to learn about the PA Early Learning Standards for Early Childhood? Would you like to explore ways in which curriculum and assessment are linked to these Standards?

Join Trying Together at The Homewood Early Learning Hub for two three-hour professional growth sessions that meet Keystone STARS Core Series requirements. Six hours of PQAS / Act 48 credits will be awarded to participants who attend both sessions.

Register

To register, visit the event webpages:

More Information

For more information, contact Theresa Hetler at 412.421.3889 or theresa@tryingtogether.org.

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News

June 10, 2019

Integrating Early Childhood Learning Standards into Curriculum & Assessment

Do you need to learn about the PA Early Learning Standards for Early Childhood? Would you like to explore ways in which curriculum and assessment are linked to these Standards?

Join Trying Together at The Homewood Early Learning Hub for two three-hour professional growth sessions that meet Keystone STARS Core Series requirements. Six hours of PQAS / Act 48 credits will be awarded to participants who attend both sessions.

Register

To register, visit the event webpages:

More Information

For more information, contact Theresa Hetler at 412.421.3889 or theresa@tryingtogether.org.

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News

June 1, 2019

Pittsburgh Infant/Toddler Symposium

Kaplan and YWCA Greater Pittsburgh PD/TA are partnering to provide a day of training and networking for area infant/toddler teachers. The day will consist of an opening keynote address, four hours of professional development training, resource tables. Lunch will be provided at no cost. This event is PQAS approved.

CDA Content Areas

The symposium will focus on the following CDA content areas:

  • Principles of Child Growth and Development
  • Social and Emotional Development
  • Safe, Healthy Learning Environments

Learning Objectives

The students will be able to:

  • Discuss and explain topics that are relevant to the care and growth/development of infants and toddlers.

Participants will have the opportunity to choose from a wide variety of courses related to infant/toddler caregiving. Courses offered at the Symposium will focus on topics such as; activities to stimulate brain development, social/emotional development, trauma-informed practice, and health/safety.

Registration

Registrations must be submitted by May 24, 2019 via the Symposium’s event page.

Questions

For questions, contact Tom Yeager at 412.255.1173 or tyeager@ywcapgh.org.

To learn more, see their event page.

News

May 28, 2019

Development Through the Eyes of an ELL Child

Join Professor Lois Wachtel in this edWebinar as she discusses early childhood developmental milestones through the eyes of a child, particularly an English language learner (ELL) child. Those who work with three- and four-year-old children will have the opportunity to take a closer look at their growth.

About

While we know all young children are amazing individuals, can you recall the vast amount of growth that is taking place in their world on a regular basis? At what age can we expect young children to be able to answer a simple question, name familiar colors, throw a ball, or demonstrate simple problem-solving skills?

During this webinar, Wachtel will discuss all this and more, providing a well-rounded perspective of how young children are building language, physical, cognitive, social-emotional, and motor development skills. Specific examples will be provided with ELLs in mind.

Time for questions will be provided. Continuing Education Credits available.

Registration

For more information and to register, visit the event website.

News

May 1, 2019

Carnegie Library’s 2019 List of Best Books for Babies

For the twentieth time since 2000, a group of local librarians and child development experts has sorted through the previous year’s publications to select and promote the 10 Best Books for Babies.

About Best Books for Babies

The Best Books for Babies project is intended to encourage reading beginning at birth and recognize publishers who create excellent books for the very youngest listeners. The books selected, from sturdy board books to fun lift-the-flap titles to charming picture book portraits of young families, will delight and engage babies age birth through 18 months and the adults who care for them.

See the List

Families and caregivers can view the full list by visiting the Library’s PDF.

Where to Find Them

Pick up one or more of these books at a Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh branch near you. In addition to spending some cozy time together, you’ll be preparing baby’s brain to learn and grow.

*Information provided by the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

News

April 9, 2019

Trauma-Informed Care: Training Session

Our past experiences – personal, familial, societal – influence our brain development and shape how we interpret and respond to the world. Sometimes adults do not recognize how these experiences manifest as behaviors and they unintentionally harm children. This introductory session is designed to change participants’ approach to the behaviors children exhibit to decrease the likelihood of triggering them.

Session Objectives

  • Participants will be introduced to the Trauma-Informed Care framework.
  • Participants will become familiar with the foundations of Trauma-Informed Care.
  • Participants will understand complex trauma and the parts of the brain related to trauma.
  • Participants will learn to recognize the impacts of trauma.

To pre-register for this session, visit their Eventbrite page.

*A certificate of participation will be given upon request.

Session Focus Areas

General Overview
  • Trauma-Informed Care Framework
  • Complex Trauma including Brain Development
  • Impacts of Trauma
What ELIE Circle Is Bringing
  • Self-Reflection
  • Self-Care
  • Growth Mindset
Intentionally Building Relationships
  • Importance
  • Barriers including Race and Gender
  • Techniques
Communication
  • Importance
  • Barriers
  • Techniques including Motivational Interviewing, Empathic Communication, Restorative Practices

About ELIE Circle

ELIE Circle works to eliminate that through professional development training sessions that create trauma-informed communities – environments that focus on not re-traumatizing individuals and assist with development that may have been lost or delayed due to trauma – emotion regulation and empathy for example. ELIE Circle provides the following professional development services:

  • Collaboration to create training sessions for organizations
  • Consultation on creating trauma-informed out-of-school programs
  • Facilitation of discussions with Q&A

*Each customer receives a free consultation meeting to discuss organizational needs.

Questions & Concerns

For any questions or concerns, contact Debralyn Woodberry-Shaw, MSW, LSW at eliecircle@gmail.com.